How to Homeschool Like a Minimalist

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How to Homeschool Like a Minimalist

Homeschooling is challenging and time consuming for parents but it doesn’t have to consume all of your time. If you’re feeling a bit overwhelmed and find yourself wishing for a simpler way of doing things, perhaps it’s time to take a minimalist approach to homeschool.

Naturally, you want the very best for your kids and that includes a good, quality education that will help them advance through life. For this reason, many parents tend to collect an abundance of school supplies that includes everything from workbooks to craft supplies. Schools have so many resources that you may feel like you have to compete with them in order for your child to receive the same education at home.

How to Homeschool Like a Minimalist

However, that’s not necessarily the case. In fact, having too much stuff can actually hinder the learning experience for your kids and make homeschooling a nightmare for you. Trying to sort through too much information just makes teaching and learning more difficult and that’s why many parents are changing their mindset when it comes to homeschooling.

Here’s how to homeschool like a minimalist:

Accept the fact that you don’t need every type of book, curriculum or teacher’s aide available to give your kids a great education. All it does is create clutter that can actually hinder the learning process. It’s hard to concentrate and stay on track in a clutter-filled environment. It also makes it difficult to find what you need to teach class and clean up is a pain.

Visit the library. Instead of buying a bunch of books that end up setting on the shelf collecting dust after a few weeks, visit the library once a week or every two weeks. This will give you an unlimited supply of reading material on most any subject. You’ll always have access to something new and don’t have to worry about storage.

Don’t buy school supplies you don’t really need. It’s hard to pass up a good deal when you see pencils, paper, notebooks and other supplies on sale. However, if you don’t need it now or in the near future then, it’s not really a good deal. Collecting items you don’t need only adds to the clutter and complicates the teaching and learning process.

Learn on the go. You don’t always have to sit around a table looking at books. Plan some field trips where the kids can learn on the go. Instead of reading a book about animals, visit the zoo. Learn about history by visiting the museum or get your kids interested in science by taking a tour of a natural carven. There are so many wonderful places to go and things to see. Get out and explore a little.

Keep your schedule light. When you have a heavy work schedule, it’s too hard to keep up. Things may go well for awhile but over time it will become a burden and stressful for you and the kids. You don’t have to teach every subject every single day. You can focus on one subject per day each week or do reading, writing and math on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays and other subjects on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Skip around a little and try different things until you find a schedule that works for your family.


Taking a minimalist approach to homeschooling doesn’t mean limiting your child’s education. It means simplifying things so you’re spending less time sorting through complicated curriculum and tons of books and supplies and more time actually teaching your kids. It gives you more time to concentrate on the things that are really important instead of trying to do too many things in a day. As a result, you won’t feel so stressed and overwhelmed and your kids receive a better education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Homeschool Like a Minimalist

 

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