Is Your Family Cut Out For Road Schooling?

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Is Your Family Cut Out For Road Schooling?

Do you have a love for adventure? Do you get excited at the thought of living in an RV, meeting new people regularly and traveling to different locations to see the sights? If so, you don’t have to put your dream of travel on hold until your kids graduate from high school. Consider homeschooling instead, or more specifically, road schooling.

Is Your Family Cut Out For Road Schooling

One of the great things about homeschooling is its flexibility. You have the freedom to choose how, when and where you teach class, even if that means doing so as you travel across the country. Road schooling is fun, exciting and it’s a great way to give your kids the education they need while living your dream. It’s a wonderful way for students of all ages to learn about this beautiful world they live in.

They’ll meet new people, see things many kids only read about, and learn firsthand how people in different areas live. Of course, it’s not for everyone, even if traveling the country sounds appealing to you. Traveling and homeschooling can be stressful at times but the benefits are many. So, how do you know if road schooling is right for you?

Take time to set down and talk about it with the family. Do the kids understand what living in an RV and traveling around really means? Is everyone excited and thinking it’s a good idea or is there someone who prefers living in your home? Talk about how it will be traveling and some of the main things you would like to do and see while on the road.

Is Road Schooling Right for You?

 

If everyone seems to be on board, here are a few more things to consider that may help you decide if road schooling is right for your family:

• Space will be limited. Living in close quarters can be stressful at times. In fact, you may even have second thoughts once in awhile and wonder why you ever thought this was a good idea but that’s normal. There’s very little privacy so expect tensions to build occasionally. You also won’t have much room for storing school supplies so choose your curriculum accordingly.

• You need a plan. Before you set out on your journey, you need a plan that outlines where you plan to visit, the route you plan to take, how long to stay in each place and so forth. This will help you determine which curriculum will work best for your homeschool and allow you to plan field trips along the way. Check for special events, museums and other interesting places to see and things to do during the time you’re traveling through the areas.

• Know the requirements for homeschooling. Homeschooling requirements are different for every state. Normally, you will need to know and comply with the homeschool laws for the state you call home and pay taxes in.

• You must be flexible. Flexibility is vital when learning on the road. Things don’t always go according to plan. You may need to make a lot of last minute changes to your school schedule. You need to be flexible enough to make changes without getting stressed or allowing yourself to get too far behind.

• Have a system for record keeping. This is very important. At some point, you may be required to show proof of your homeschooling efforts. You will need to show what the kids learned in the classroom and on field trips.

These are a few of the most important things you need to know about road schooling. It gives you an idea of what to expect before pulling the kids out of school and packing your bags. How well things go will depend on your family’s personalities, likes and dislikes but it will go much smoother when you’re prepared.

If you’re adventurous and don’t mind living on the go, road schooling is a fun and exciting way to learn. Your kids will learn many things about life and people in general that most kids don’t learn until they’re grown.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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